Obama - AP - May 22, 2011
U.S. President Barack Obama at the AIPAC conference on May 22, 2011. Photo by AP
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U.S. President Obama told a group of his Jewish supporters in Washington on Monday night that "there may be tactical disagreements" in terms of how to resolve the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, but added that everyone shares the goal of achieving peace where kids can go to bed at night and not worry about missiles falling on them.

Obama also said to the group of Jewish donors that his most important message was that the U.S. and Israel "will always be stalwart allies and friends” and the bond between the countries is unbreakable. However, the U.S. President warned that the Palestinian-Israeli conflict needs a fresh approach, otherwise the results won’t be different than before.

"But it’s going to require some hard work," Obama said. " And it’s going to require that not only this administration employs all of its creative powers to try to bring about peace in the region, but it’s also going to require all of you as engaged citizens of the United States who are friends of Israel making sure that you are giving us suggestions, you are in an honest dialogue with us, that you’re helping to shape how both Americans and Israelis think about the opportunities and challenges."

President Obama took part tonight at two Democratic fundraisers at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel in Washington, DC, for the Obama Victory Fund. The first was a dinner with Americans in Support of a Strong U.S.-Israel Relationship. The second was dinner with the Mid-Atlantic Finance Committee, for about 100 participants.

If there were worries that Jewish donors would get cold feet this elections season, they were unfounded. The fundraiser was sold out, with about 80 participants with tickets that range from 25,000 to the highest possible, for an Obama Victory fund event of 35,800.

One of the hosts of the first fundraising event, National Jewish Democratic Council Chairman Marc Stanley told Haaretz in an earlier conversation that he “absolutely disagrees” that these elections will be more difficult with regard to Jewish donors.

“Key donors are much more savvy than Republicans would have you believe and have taken a much more critical eye towards Republican attempts to lie about the President's record,” he said.

“I couldn’t understand why Haim Saban is news," he said. "Saban did not give to Obama’s campaign in 2008. But, that does not mean Haim Saban has an issue with the President on Israel. In fact, he went on the record to the Washington Post to say that President Obama wasn't anti-Israel and that using Israel as a wedge issue is wrong.”