Protest
A Palestinian protester holding a placard with a drawing depicting PA President Mahmoud Abbas and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during an anti-peace talks rally in Ramallah, March 19, 2014. Photo by AP
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A New York Times interview with the son of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas indicates just how divided Palestinians are on the two-state solution.

"If you don't want to give me independence, at least give me civil rights," the son, Tareq Abbas, told Jerusalem bureau chief Jodi Rudoren in an interview the Times published Tuesday. Advocating the creation of a single state on the land between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea, the 48-year-old described the one-state solution as "an easier, peaceful way."

He stressed, "I don’t want to throw anything, I don’t want to hate anybody, I don’t want to shoot anybody. I want to be under the law.”

The vice president of the Arab Palestinian Investment Company, the younger Abbas' attitude reflects a generation gap between the old guard of Palestinian leadership and their children, according to the Times article.

“Just ask my son,” wrote Khalil Mr. Shikaki, 60, the director of the Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research in an email to the Times. “He will tell you that my generation has failed and should exit the stage and take its mainstream paradigm, the two-state solution, along with it."

Shikaki explained that the views of his generation "were formed during the heyday of the Palestinian national movement," while his son's views "were formed during the filaed years of Oslo, the days of perceived Palestinian Authority corruption and tyranny, the Internet and social media."

Tareq Abbas, whose Facebook posts are mostly apolitical, said his father should abandon negotiations, dissolve the Palestinian Authority and force Israel "to take full responsibility for the West Bank, as a pressure tactic," according to the Times.

At the same time, he said he does not tell his father what to do. "Who am I to tell him this?" he added. "Even as a father I can’t talk to him like this, you want me to say to the president like this?”