With whom will the opposition negotiate? - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • Rammer
    • 03.02.11 | 03:20 (IST)

    ElBaradei and the Muslim Brethren refuse to discuss the transition to a new regime as long as Mubark is in office, but they have not made it clear that they will not negotiate with other stalwarts of the regime once he has gone. It seems to me that both Baradei and the Brethren are leaving the door open for dealing with the VP and the cabinet once Mubark’s fall makes such an engagement less odious. They will be dealing with a man who is a close ally of the US, and was complicit with the US extraordinary rendition program which saw the torture of many prisoners in Egypt. They will be negotiating reforms with the existing political-military-security structure that was at the core of Mubarak’s regime. This bodes ill for the uprising except if it can sustain itself long enough to force a clean up of the top echelons of the regime. It is difficult to see at this point if this will be possible. There are two opposing forces here: One is that the uprising is partly a bread riot, and this segment of it will not be appeased by superficial political reforms. The other factor is that the uprising is hurting the huge tourist industry. I think Egypt's tourist industry it accounts for about 12% of GDP and generates about 1/8 of the jobs in the country, directly and indirectly. So there will be strong pressure from that side to end the strife. These are the things to watch for now.

    from the article: Is Mubarak at the end of his tether?
    First published 01:53 03.02.11 | Last updated 01:53 03.02.11
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