Understanding Olmert - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • Tosefta
    • 21.11.07 | 19:00 (IST)

    I find it difficult to believe that Eldar does not already understand how Olmert functions. Eldar is probably reluctant to make blanket statements that will forever taint him as an anti-Olmert journalist, and so he presents his view in the form of questions. Since I am not a journalist, I will give a characterization of Olmert which will answer Eldar's questions. 1. Olmert has little talent for statesmanship, although he is a talented political animal. 2. Olmert does not see much further beyond his nose (in state matters) and must change his mind frequently. 3. Olmert lacks ideology and core beliefs, but has initial Pavlovian hard-line Likud responses. We have seen all of this in the Lebanon war, and the initial telltale sign for me was the declaration of UNATTAINABLE goals (destroying Hizballah and freeing the soldiers). At the time, after Israel broke the cease fire with Hamas, started a war in Gaza and had Shalit kidnapped, I called it "blind Samson (of the Gaza gates) moving on to Lebanon." As far as demanding recognition of Israel as a Jewish state, this demand should not be made now, nor even in the future. It is unnecessary, and the Palestinians are unlikely to yield on it. Note that this demand was not made of Egypt, nor Jordan. Being a "Jewish state" has some internal legal meaning in Israel, which the law itself leaves unclear. But for the Palestinians, the demand means that Israel requires that they accept that the Jews came to their land and took over most of it to create their state, and that the Jews were justified in doing so. Now, from the Palestinian point of view this is no justice. In any case, this type of justice can only be determined by Allah, not man. And nobody knows what Allah's motivation was, to do justice to the Jews, to punish His people the Palestinians for some pre-Gilgul sins, or whatever. All that one can demand from the Palestinians is that they accept Israel as an independent state not their own, and accept its right to live in peace. Let Allah take care of the rest. Likewise, the Greater Israel crowd should accept similar notions about independent Palestine and leave the rest to Moshiach.

    from the article: Peace is not child's play
    First published 00:00 21.11.07 | Last updated 00:00 21.11.07
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