The non-democratic forces are now a majority among Israeli Jews - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • 27.11.11 | 17:34 (IST)

    Let us look at the composition of Israeli Jews today: 1. The former Soviets constitute about 20%. They grew up under a totalitarian regime and tend to prefer strong leaders and a brute-force approach. 2. The Sephardim/Mizrahim (from Islamic states), constitute about 1/3 of the Jews. They tend to hate Arabs, their former oppressors, tend to be more emotional people, and their grounding in democracy is still weak. Shasniks are of course worse in this respect. 3. Religious Ashkenazis, including Haredim, about 10% of the Jews (as estimated by Knesset representation, which minimizes their numbers because they have many children). Haredim and the religious are messianists and believe in Religious Law as superior to state law.// Altogether we have about 2/3 of the Jews with hardline tendencies, based on cultural and religious background. To them one could add some secular Ashkenazi right-wingers like B. Begin and U. Landau and you see that Israel is facing a democratic crisis. The big question is: How did the State manage to be formed as a democracy in the first place? The simple answer is that the main non-democratic forces were not yet citizens: The Russians, Sephardim, Haredim, and religious messianists, had a small and negligible representation in the 1948 Yishuv. They are now ready and able to destroy what their more democratic brothers had established.

    from the article: Rabbi Yoffie to Haaretz: Anti-democratic laws ‘catastrophic’ for Israel's ties with Diaspora Jews
    First published 15:05 27.11.11 | Last updated 15:05 27.11.11
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