Stranger than fiction - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • Sarah G.
    • 21.01.12 | 17:18 (IST)

    In Natasha Mozgovaya's recent article in Ha'aretz, "Washington's ultimatum to Israel", she wote: "The President of the United States, haunted by troubles home and abroad, finally decides to forge a breakthrough on the Palestinian-Israeli conflict - at any price. He separately summons Israeli and Palestinian leaders, and presents them with an ultimatum: for Israel, lack of agreement means no more aid and no more vetoes at the UN Security Council. In "The President's Ultimatum," the first novel penned by the former Citicorp executive John Cavaiuolo - who writes under the pen name John Cavi - reality is mixed with fiction, but many characters are easily recognizable. The 43rd U.S. President is Gerald W. Burke, there is an Israeli prime minister called "Ehud Colmert," a right-wing leader called Bibi Nathane, and Palestinian leaders Habbas and Qurei. Ariel Sharon goes by his own name, and his reaction to the ultimatum is not at all positive. He tries to buy time, says he'll be ready when terror is defeated, complains about political strains and "Israeli people that wouldn't accept it." The President brushes aside all excuses and presses harder. Recalling their conversation, Burke thinks to himself: "Threatening Sharon with an embargo and a cessation of $8 billion dollars in aid was probably too harsh and perhaps counterproductive", adding later that, "the arrogant son of a bitch deserved to be humiliated. President Burke is warned of the Congress and the pro-Israeli organizations; harsh reactions of Evangelicals and the Jewish community - and even of a possible assassination attempt. The rest is a quickly developing plot, focused less on the peace process and more on Al-Qaida, the Mossad, and numerous assassination attempts, some of them successful. The saddest point, however, is that even in this work of fiction, the historical agreement is soon jeopardized. Burke finishes his term with his Secretary of State Samantha Robins predicting "dragging feet" if Bibi Nathane will become Prime Minister, stating "we are back to square one."

    from the article: Jewish publisher is an idiot - but his hatred is shared by many
    First published 14:03 21.01.12 | Last updated 14:03 21.01.12
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