Sorry Gideon but you can't have something for nothing - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • Zionist forever
    • 01.09.11 | 11:25 (IDT)

    You don't like the high import duties on cars and televisions that's fine but you also want the government to spend money on housing, healthcare and many other things but if the government is earning less from import taxes where is it going to get all the extra money it needs to pay for th social welfare projects, simple economics. You can't force private companies like cellphone providers to lower their prices. Also the reason such things are more expensive here is because abroad the cellphone providers sell the phones at a loss and in exchange they tie you into long contracts. Here they don't sell phones at such heavy subsidized prices and they are under no obligation to as they are private companies not govermen owned. Higher salaries, agreed Israelis are underpaid but there is nothing thee government can do to change that. Government can set a minimum wage but companies who pay above minimum wage but bellow what's a fair salary for the job they do can't be forced by the government to pay more, the individual either accepts that's what they will be paid when they apply for the job otherwise they don't apply ... Personal choice. Fuel prices, israel imports all its fuel and oil prices fluctuate. Supermarkets are privately owned businesses and that give them the right to charge anything they like. If you don't like the prices then there is a simpl solution and that's don't shop there, don't demand th government force them to lower thir prices. Sorry Gideon but the government is not going to subsidize every little thing you might want to buy or order companies to pay a fair wage or to sell their products at lower prices. What Bibi can and is trying to do is break up monopolies, spend extra money in areas where it's economically viable and justified but it's not going to tell private companies what prices to set or cut taxes and at the same time spend more it's one or the other. Socialism is dead Gideon and protesting won't resurrect it from the dead.

    from the article: 'March of the Million' is litmus test for a new Israel
    First published 03:01 01.09.11 | Last updated 03:01 01.09.11
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