revolutions dont solve economic problems - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • zionist forever
    • 25.02.11 | 08:14 (IST)

    It doesn't matter who is running the country if the economy is not strong enough there will not be the jobs and increasing the minimum wage at a time when the economy is very weak will only increase unemployment. The Egyptians were expecting that once Mubarak was gone suddenly Egypt would become the Garden of Eden where nobody has any wants or needs.. nobody thought that much beyond Mubarak. It's the same in Libya now where all anybody can think about is get Gaddafi out but non of them are thinking about who will run the country and most probably the result will be a civil war started by the various clans. For Egyptians they will have to accept its going to be a long hard road for Egypt to become the country they dream of and just electing a civilian government won't solve that. The two & half weeks of protest brought the economy to the brink of collapse and the more strikes they hold the more damage it will do to the economy and that will make job creation harder.

    from the article: Egypt workers continue to strike amid fears of revolution backlash
    First published 02:10 25.02.11 | Last updated 02:10 25.02.11
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