PMB - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • zionist forever
    • 13.02.11 | 17:43 (IST)

    Revolutions are not always for the better. I would hardly say the French revolution brought about a better France, The Russian revolution, did that bring about a better Russia? They got rid of the dictator but they got something worse. In Iraq we got rid of the tyrant who brought stability to terrorist rule, no Iraqi is safe now in the streets. The thing about revolutions is you never know the outcome some might be for the better like the American one and others might create a situation thats worse. There is also no guarantee democracy will last and a weak democratic government won't be toppled Look at Lebanon. In Afghanistan the new president is not so pro US anymore and has even threatened to try form an alliance with the Taliban... thats gratitude for you. In general whats good for Israel is the arab kings and dictators because they are the enemy you know and in Mubarak's case the dictator you can do business with. Democracy creates an unknown outcome. Would you want the Saudi royal family toppled in favor of democracy? Right now the Saudi royals are pro US, spend billions on western products and make sure politics isn't allowed to enter the oil business. What happens if they were toppled and a more radical government was elected and decided to use oil as a weapon to blackmail the west and decided to get into bed with countries like Iran? Do you want to be paying $100 a gallon of gas? What would happen if Egypt got a government like the Muslim Brothehood and they decided they no longer wanted to honor the peace treaty or even worse decided they wanted to refuse certain countries access to the Suez Canal. Sure right now it doesn't look probable but in democracy you can't control who is going to be elected or what their policies they make which is why Mubarak was good for the west. I don't know which country your from but it took the west centuries to fine tune democracy but back then there was no global economy and if one country got it wrong it could damage the economies of the entire world. Right now the west needs to try and calm things down in the region we don't want revolution after revolution because eventually somebody is going to get it wrong and it will lead to war.

    from the article: Israel must congratulate Egypt
    First published 01:27 13.02.11 | Last updated 01:27 13.02.11
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