orthodox jews are hared more in the jewish state than anywhere else in the western world - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • zionist forever
    • 22.04.11 | 09:40 (IDT)

    Notices announcing the local offering people to come have a Seder at a Chabad centre or offering advice on how to clean utensils and appliances. How is that affecting the neighborhood? If you don't care about all that you ignore the sign. the people who are interested in going to a seder at a Chabad centre or if you would like to clean their utensils but don't know the proper way to go about it will be grateful for this information. Things like Chabad centres harm nobody. Nobody forces the locals to come in but for those that want they can go. Its like having a synagogue in the area .. nobody forces the seculars to go but its there is they want it. Groups like Chabad are groups to be admired not despised because they do alot of good work and are charitable. I would like to see just 1 of these seculars caring as much about others that Chabad do. You find a notice on Pessach, maybe you will find them with a little table on the street for any passers by that want to put on teffilin or have a giant menorah in the street at Chanuka but thats about the bulk of it. How do any of these things affect the neighborhood. The orthodox of Ramat Aviv or Ramat Hasharon saying how people must dress or trying to enforce Jewish law on the residents. They are there offering services that seculas are free to use or not and these people LIVE THERE, are we going to ban somebody who is orthodox from living in a secular part of town? These are towns and cities not small villages. Trying to compare the idea the opening of a disco or 24 hour noisy supermarket to orthodox jews moving into town and putting up notices on how to wash utensils for Pessach or opening a centre ( which does not disrupt life outside ) is rediculous. These attitudes of hatred towards orthodox jews really does border on anti semaatism. Its almost like gang culture .. these guys wear a black hat and have beards, we dress in shorts and t shirts and we never cover our heads so they are an enemy and this is our patch so we will drive them out.

    from the article: Group formed to battle Jewish Orthodox 'invasion' of secular neighborhoods
    First published 02:00 22.04.11 | Last updated 02:00 22.04.11
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