Materialism - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • Ambience
    • 18.11.05 | 15:23 (IST)

    I find it interesting that the main thing in common with Jews, Muslims and the Americans is materialism. Greed for land, claiming there is a place somewhere on the map that is somehow 'sacred'. Shame on you. Jews think God cares about places, Muslims think so too, many who call themselves 'Christians' seem to value places, materia and even symbols like flags over everything else. Someone claims to have found a 'Christian church'. Now I will ask, in the light of the Gospels and the teachings of Christ, where is the Christian church really located? Didn't Jesus explicitly teach us each to cherish our own, to have a personal contact with God and discard things such as possessions or material goods for they have not value in the promised land, which by the way is given to you the second you accept Gods offering in Christ. It was also made clear by Christ that our church is not something you can build with your hands, but by building on the cornerstone of faith. The church is where we Christians go, where we talk, what we do, not a place where we go and pretend to be religious. The church building is just that, a building. Nothing more nothing less. Maybe built with stones, plaster and cement, or tiles or wood. It really doesn't matter, it is only a building and thus nothing to do with Faith or Christianity. Christians can meet in all kinds of buildings or out on the street, in the nature, on hills, valleys and mountaintops. But none of these places deserves to be called our temple. It is what we carry in our hearts with God. Not something that can be possessed or taken away. There is no 'one nation under god' unless it is the true promised land which is where ever we go with it in our Faith. For it has been given to us by God in Jesus Christ, noone can take it away.

    from the article: Prison dig reveals church that may be the oldest in the world
    First published 00:00 05.11.05 | Last updated 00:00 05.11.05
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