Is it real or fantasy? - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • Mark from Florida
    • 04.03.11 | 08:48 (IST)

    I wish Israel could offer an interim agreement with sufficient teeth to appeal to Palestinians. Perhaps give them 1967 borders now, with the insistence that they lease 50% of the land to Israel for periods ranging from 2 to 10 years (a little bit more binding than "we'll give you more later if you're good and our interests permit it"). Terms would end these leases on schedule, with no renewal without mutual consent. Price could initially be negligible, but ultimate title to the land goes to the Palestinians. Israel would also remove all special incentives for occupation. Without incentives and with a scheduled transition to full Palestinian control, the occupants of settlements and outposts would have effective yet not traumatic motivation to relocate. Would Israel consider this, or are they so stubborn they will insist on full border control between Palestine and the outside, for permanent possession of the settlements, permanent military bases, permanent and exclusive transportation infrastructure, and permanent access to water resources? What's in it for Israel? Less than many want. A neighbor instead of an enemy. Temporary continued use of much of the land they took by force in 67. Significant easing of international pressure. API a little closer to fulfillment. And a chance to begin undoing 4 decades of wrongful imperial ambition without need for an immediate civil war or hugely expensive reparations to the settlers to buy their consent. I look forward to Bibi's proposal, but I predict it will be a disappointing offer of highly restricted semi-autonomy to Palestinians in small areas, to ease international pressure while extending the occupation indefinitely. Most likely Bibi is counting the months until November 2012, and thinks this maneuver just bought him a few, which is all he really needs until presidential election politics take all pressure off him from America.

    from the article: Netanyahu: Binational state would be disastrous for Israel
    First published 01:00 04.03.11 | Last updated 01:00 04.03.11
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