If Tunis and Cairo can do it... - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • William - Colorado Springs, USA
    • 14.02.11 | 21:57 (IST)

    The mounting wave of uprisings against authoritarian regimes poses, by far, the greatest risk to U.S. interests. This is true because those regimes around the world that the U.S. still relies upon to serve its own interests in each region are going to get about as much support from the U.S. as Hosni Mubarek did - zilch! When the uprisings come to those countries, the U.S. isn't going to be able to keep the regimes in power - can you imagine the U.S. being seen throwing the popular "democratic" uprisings under the bus and propping up the regimes as they try to crack down on the protesters? Of course not! So this is, for all practical purposes, a guaranteed formula for "regime change" - but mostly only in the cases of the regimes the U.S. has supported until today. In the other regimes, like in Iran, Syria, Russia, China, etc etc, their leaders aren't too concerned with the image of them cracking down on protesters to maintain order and stability. So as this wave circles the globe, it's most likely to "Tahrir" the U.S.-supported regimes and leave most of the others intact. Bad news for the U.S. and for Israel, which also relies heavily upon such cruel, but anti-Islamic-radicalism regimes. One more note - the social networking phenomenon is catalyst, not cause. The cause is the short-sighted policy on the part of the liberal democracies in which they perpetually propped-up cruel dictators instead of incrementally and determinedly instilling and building liberal democratic institutions and governments in all those countries that are vital to its interests.

    from the article: Egypt upheaval may send shockwaves far beyond the Arab world
    First published 01:24 14.02.11 | Last updated 01:24 14.02.11
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