guilt on yom kippur - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • dror
    • 13.09.13 | 10:44 (IDT)

    First of all, Yom Kippur has nothing to do with guilt. The phrase found in the Torah means "to impoverish the soul". The Torah, also says nothing about fasting on Yom Kippur or giving money to the poor. Peter Beinant lives in a country that stole its land from the indians. Then it purchased stolen goods from the French and stole land from the Mexicans which had been stolen from the Aztecs by the Spanish. Finally, America purchased land from the Russians which they stole from the "Eskimos" and the Americans stole Hawaii by orchestrating a revolution is a historical fact. Thus, before Peter speaks about a dialogue with American Jews and the Palestinians, I think he should come to grips with the history of the USA. As far as beggars in the street, this too has nothing to do with Yom Kippur. Yom Kippur is a day for man to impoverish his soul by removing the wealth of man made knowledge about God (i.e Rabbinical Commentaries) and trying to re establish a direct relationship with God himself. In his 5th book, Moses said his words were like a heavy rain fall. Hence explanations about God should be equated with water. As everyone knows, the Israelites were at first deprived of water as they made their way to the Promised Land. When Moses gave in to their demands and complained to God that the people were ready to kill him, God gave the people water, but gave the role of leading the people into the Promised Land to Moses. Nowhere in the Torah does it say Moses was punished for hitting a rock with a stick. What it says is that he did not honor God's word. Finally, when Moses did give the people water, he screamed at them: "you fallen ones", meaning that had fallen from a direct relationship with God to one based on the words of men, symbolized by the water from the rock.

    from the article: Yom Kippur in Israel, or, why guilt is no good for the Jews
    First published 16:36 12.09.13 | Last updated 16:36 12.09.13
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