Bedouins - a nomad people and the necessity of urbanization. - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • Avi
    • 28.03.12 | 09:05 (IST)

    In the pre WW2 middle east, Bedouins were a nomadic people, moving from place to place constantly. With the creation of multiple states and borders, including Israel, the Bedouins could no longer travel freely. Now for the last few decades they dot the landscape in tents which a developed state finds unacceptable in the 21st century for numerous reasons. For the most obvious reasons why is the inability to build infrastructure of sewage, pipes and roads across the Negev just to reach a few tents in all directions. That is why cities were invented. With the relocation of the Bedouins the city can grant them basic services such as sewage, electricity, water, welfare, road access and education. In return the state gets to tax them for these services and in the future receive an educated workforce to drive its economy. For a state to prosper its citizens must move from tents to cities and join civilization, this is basic logic. Another reason is the vast amount of land being clogged by those scattered tents. Building new infrastructure, mining, and other public projects becomes difficult and many legal issues would arise as more land is being illegally clogged by new tents. The urbanization of the Bedouins is a necessary step to provide them and the state with progress and a better way of life. While Egypt neglected its Bedouin population in the Sinai, Israel must develop and invest in her own Bedouin population, not only for the reasons mentioned already, but to serve as an example for neighboring states.

    from the article: Israel's contentious Bedouin relocation plan passes PM's Office panel
    First published 01:53 28.03.12 | Last updated 01:53 28.03.12
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