A UFO took the WMD - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • MrRoundel
    • 20.12.05 | 01:24 (IST)

    This seems to be an argument that can never be won. One side has proof, one side has faith. One side's belief is steeped in physical facts, no WMD has been found after years of virtually unimpeded access to all of Iraq. One side is based on "I know what I know because I know it to be so,and it works with his M.O.". To date, no WMD have been found in Iraq. Hans Blix (Before the invasion), David Kay (A pretty strong GOP supporter, and picked by Bush after the invasion), and a Charles(?)Durfer (The last to throw up his hands in frustration), could not find any WMD in Iraq. Hans Blix did not have the free reign that his successors had, but none had any success in finding what King George was looking for. I too have heard the fables of WMD being smuggled into Syria, none of which have one ounce of proof other than wanting to believe it to be true. What is the time table in which these "true believers" will extend before which they'll concede that they were wrong? One year? Ten years? A millenia? Why not just make the argument that UFO's came down from the heavens and "beamed up" the WMD as a favor to Saddam, or to embarrass the King of America? I'll be the first to admit that I can't prove that this didn't happen either. I can only say, with the utmost conviction, that there is no proof that space aliens did take the WMD. It's true that I can't prove that they didn't either. While I believe that King George's mea culpa was disengenuous at best, at least he finally mouthed what is apparently the truth. Believe me, if Bush still held out hope in finding WMD in Iraq, he wouldn't have conceded "mistakes". Saddam may have posed a minor threat to Israel, but he posed no threat at all to the U.S.A. I don't blame the Israeli people for being glad that Bush toppled Saddam. But I, as an free-thinking American, never believed that Saddam threatened me or my family, therefore I have opposed going into Iraq from day one. My only mea culpa so far is to say that I take full responsibility for being right, at least in this millenia. Shame on me.

    from the article: Two wrongs don't make a right
    First published 00:00 18.12.05 | Last updated 00:00 18.12.05
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