# 86 Tom - Comment - Israel News | Haaretz Daily Newspaper
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    • Nick Ferriman
    • 04.05.07 | 05:49 (IDT)

    Dear Tom, Thank you very much for your reply. To answer your first statement, you say that the US Constitution does not contain the right to rebel seems odd given that the US was founded in an act of rebellion. Is the US an illegal establishment? Secondly, you say that the way one fights is always limited by international law. But if the US refuses to co-operate with any of the international courts of justice, as it does in the prosecution for war crimes of its own soldiers, and also refuses to prosecute government officials of other states who commits crimes against humanity, then ordinary citizens have no recourse in International law. It seems to me that international law is for protecting mighty states from prosecution by their citizenry. Doesn?t sound very democratic to me. Thirdly, you say occupation is not ipso facto illegal. Well, that doesn?t fit with Article One of the ICCPR, which clearly states that all people have the right to self-determination. The ICCPR is a central feature of international law, signed by both the US and Israel. The Palestinians have clearly indicated their dissatisfaction with Israeli rule by rebellion, like the US did, and have even voted on it. In your fourth point you say the Hamas charter denies the self-determination of Israel. This is perverse logic. Hamas came into being some 20 years after the start of the Israeli occupation. Who is denying who self-determination? Despite your claims, the UDHR says clearly in its preamble that if men are oppressed they will be compelled to fight back. The whole thrust of the Declaration is say what those acts are that oppress men. Israel is in breach of many of the Declaration?s articles, so we should not be surprised that the Palestinians are fighting back. Their human rights are being brutally abused. However, I am not surprised by the stance of many in the US. Americans have a history of oppression that runs deep. The extirpation of the North American Indians and the oppression of Black Americans are two cases in point. What is deeply distressing is that the US now repudiates the spirit of the UDHR. It was as if Nuremberg never happened.

    from the article: U.S. District Court in Manhattan clears Dichter in war crimes suit
    First published 00:00 03.05.07 | Last updated 00:00 03.05.07
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