U.S. comedian and TV host Stephen Colbert has unleashed what seems to be a series of satirical ad campaign in South Carolina, ahead of the planned Republican primary in the state.

Colbert, famous for his "fake news" show The Colbert Report, aired the ads after a survey by Public Policing Polling last week surprisingly revealed that the comedian was more likely to win South Carolina than "real" candidate John Huntsman.

Huntsman, who has been trailing the field throughout the primary, announced that he would be suspending his campaign on Monday.

In one ad released earlier this week, and titled "Attack in B Minor for String," Colbert's Super PAC, a fund-raising body which is supposed to refrain from any official connections to candidates' campaigns, released an add mocking frontrunner Mitt Romney.

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In the ad, the Super PAC quotes Romney as saying that "corporations are people," and then going to insinuate the former Massachusetts governor was a "serial killer" for tearing up firms for sale in his days as an businessman.

The second ad, titled "Not Abel," and which came out on Monday, Colbert's Super PAC endorses Pizza boss Herman Cain, who in fact withdrew from the race a few weeks ago following negative numbers and an ever-escalating sex scandal.

In an episode aired earlier this week Colbert, following his "favorable" poll numbers, announced that he would be forming "an exploratory committee" that would check whether or not he may run in the South Carolina primary.

While Colbert's attempts are no doubt meant as a jag at the Republican primary campaign, if he would in fact choose to run he would not be the first comedian-turn-politician, after noted left-wing satirist Al Franken was elected as Minnesota's junior Senator in 2008.