When Barack Obama touches down in Israel next Wednesday, he will be the fifth sitting U.S. president to visit the country. Here's another statistic: he'll be the third who didn't drop by during his first term, but is coming in the second one.

How else does his visit stack up to those leaders of the free world who came before him?

Richard Nixon

• Date of visit: June 16-17, 1974
• Presidential term: Second
• Length of visit: 24 hours
• Accompanied by: First Lady Pat Nixon and Secretary of State Henry Kissinger
• Notable events: State dinner with Israeli leaders; visited Golda Meir at her home in Rehavia, Jerusalem; went to Yad Vashem.

In 1974, six months after the conclusion of the Yom Kippur War, U.S. President Richard Nixon became the first U.S. president to ever visit Israel. He arrived from Damascus with his wife and Secretary of State Henry Kissinger in tow.

His 24-hour jaunt began on June 16 of that year and ended the very next day. Yet he managed to include a visit with then Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (who had just begun his first stint at Israel’s helm earlier that month), to deliver what some pundits called a rambling speech on foreign policy, and to deliver a delicate dance around the subject of Watergate, which was already dogging him.

Nixon ruffled some feathers by initially refusing to visit the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial and Museum in Jerusalem. He did finally acquiesce but refusing to don a kippah at the site.

While no agreements were inked during his time here, he made history simply by being the first incumbent American president to step foot on Israeli soil, paving the way for presidents to come.

Jimmy Carter

• Date of visit: March 10-13, 1979
• Presidential term: First
• Length of visit: Four days
• Accompanied by: First Lady Rosalynn Carter
• Notable events: Peace negotiations concerning Egypt treaty; live-broadcast of Knesset address; visit to Yad Vashem

Jimmy Carter was the second U.S. president to arrive, on March 10, 1979, just a few weeks before Egypt and Israel would sign their landmark peace agreement on the White House lawn.

His four-day visit, which was instrumental in brokering that deal, included a visit to Yad Vashem (kippah included), meetings with U.S. and Israeli officials involved in the peace negotiations, and an address to the Knesset, broadcast live on Israeli television. He arrived from Cairo with his wife Rosalynn Carter.

William Jefferson Clinton

First trip
• Date of visit: October 27-28, 1994
• Presidential term: First
• Length of visit: Two days
• Accompanied by: First Lady Hillary Clinton
• Notable events: Knesset address; met with senior Israeli official

Second trip
• Date of visit: November 5-6, 1995
• Presidential term: First
• Length of visit: Two days
• Accompanied by: First Lady Hillary Clinton
• Notable events: Attended the funeral of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin

Third trip
• Date of visit: March 13-14, 1996
• Presidential term: First
• Length of visit: Two days
• Accompanied by: Alone; First Lady Hillary Clinton did not accompany him
• Notable events: Pledged $100 million to Israel for fighting terror

Fourth trip
• Date of visit: December 12-15, 1998
• Presidential term: Second
• Length of visit: Four days
• Accompanied by: First Lady Hillary Clinton
• Notable events: Last-ditch attempt to broker Israeli-Palestinian peace plan

No president has been more visible in Israel than Bill Clinton, who paid a total of four visits to the Jewish state during his two terms in office and became hugely popular among Israelis.

His first visit, from October 27-28, 1994, included a Knesset address and meetings with senior officials. The second visit was significantly more somber; Clinton arrived on November 5, 1995 to attend the funeral of Rabin. He left the following day.

He returned four months later, on March 13, 1996, for a two-day visit tied to an Egyptian peace summit and anchored by a $100-million commitment to help Israel fight terrorism. This was the only visit on which he was not accompanied by his wife Hillary.

Clinton’s final stop in Israel as president came on December 12, 1998, when he labored over the Israeli-Palestinian peace process, took time to light Hanukkah candles with Israeli children, and like his predecessor two decades before him, dodged his own impeachment rumors.

George W. Bush

First trip
• Date of visit: January 9-11, 2008
• Presidential term: Second
• Length of visit: Three days
• Accompanied by: Alone; First Lady Laura Bush did not accompany him
• Notable events: Met with Prime Minister Ehud Olmert; met with President Shimon Peres; visited Yad Vashem

Second trip

• Date of visit: May 14-16, 2008
• Presidential term: Second
• Length of visit: Three days
• Accompanied by: First Lady Laura Bush
• Notable events: Celebrated 60 years of Israeli statehood; Tried, without success, to broker peace between Israel and the Palestinians.

George W. Bush first arrived in Israel at the twilight of his second term, squeezing in two visits during his eighth year as president.

The first, from January 9-11, 2008, included a parley in Ramallah with Mahmoud Abbas, president of the Palestinian Authority, and the outlining of concrete terms for a two-state solution, something he hoped to accomplish before leaving office.

He was not accompanied by his wife Laura, who had visited Israel solo in 2005 during a goodwill trip to the Middle East, but the first lady did accompany him when he returned in May 2008. That trip, from May 14-16, was made to promote Israel’s 60th anniversary and carry out last-ditch efforts to broker a two-state solution before leaving office.

As for Barack Obama, this will be his first trip as a sitting president, though it isn't his first to the Holy Land. He's scheduled to come for three days, from March 20 to 22, though Rome-watchers had fretted that his visit could be truncated if the Vatican conclave chosen an American to be the next pope, necessitating a dash to Rome.

During his visit he'll be getting up close and personal with an Iron Dome battery, hold a joint press conference with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and give a speech not at the Knesset but directly to the Israeli public, complete with audience members handpicked by the U.S. Embassy via a contest on Facebook. He will be joined by newly-minted Secretary of State John Kerry and an entourage large enough to require booking the entire King David Hotel, as did George W. Bush before him.