Turkish Prime Minister will visit Iran next month to discuss the results of preceding nuclear security summit in South Korea, the Turkish daily Today's Zaman reported on Thursday.

According to the report, the Turkish PM ins scheduled to meet Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in Tehran in the week following 2012 Seoul Nuclear Security Summit, due to take place on March 26-27.

News of Erdogan's planned visit came amid a continued standoff between Iran and the West over the Islamic Republic's nuclear program, on which Israeli asserts is geared toward the production of nuclear weapons.

Earlier this week, Iran's Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Salehi said that the Islamic Republic expected talks with the United Nations nuclear watchdog to continue, adding that it was optimistic that said negotiations would proceed in the right direction.

Salehi also criticized western powers for accusing Iran for developing nuclear weapons while advancing the P5+1 nuclear talks, which he revealed will take place in Istanbul, Turkey.

In the latest high-level talks between the IAEA and Iran, conducted in Tehran in January and February, Iranian officials stuck to a refusal to address intelligence reports about covert research relevant to developing nuclear weapons. Iran says its nuclear program is for peaceful energy purposes only.

"We expect the dialogue that has started will continue," Iran's Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Salehi told reporters after giving a speech to the UN-sponsored Conference on Disarmament.

"There was some disagreement on drafting an initial framework that would set the ground for a new roadmap as how to proceed.

"We are optimistic," he added, "that upcoming meetings between the high delegation of the IAEA and the Iranian (side) will be proceeding hopefully in the right direction."

The IAEA said that, given Iran's unwillingness to tackle the allegations of research with military nuclear applications, no further talks were scheduled.
 

 

In the latest high-level talks between the IAEA and Iran, conducted in Tehran in January and February, Iranian officials stuck to a refusal to address intelligence reports about covert research relevant to developing nuclear weapons. Iran says its nuclear program is for peaceful energy purposes only.