A Haredi man suspected of shooting an acquaintance in an alleged murder-suicide case in Tel Aviv's was put to rest Thursday afternoon in Rishon Lezion .

The two men, Eliyahu Aberman (19) and Ohad Rosenberg (31), both volunteers with the ZAKA rescue organization and the police, were found dead in a vehicle in  Tel Aviv's Montefiore neighborhood late Wednesday night, with a gun found next to them in the vehicle.

At the Rishon Lezion funeral, sources close to Rosenberg, who police suspect shot Aberman to death before killing himself, said that Rosenberg "carried a vendetta against the Aberman family and maintained that they were trying to ruin his life."

During the course of the funeral, Rosenberg's brother produced a letter that he had left to be found after his death. In it, he asked for forgiveness from his parents and sent them kisses. Family members prevented the brother from continuing to read the letter.

"We treated him like one of the family, and now look what's he's done." Ohad Rosenberg's mother said of Eliyahu Aberman, who was shot to death. "People say they are a family of saints. You call this saintly? We forgive you for everything."

Moshe Gamro, Central Region Commander of ZAKA, who knew Rosenberg when he performed a year of national service with the organization, said that "recently, he was very bitter because he was still unmarried, after a recent arranged relationship ended unsuccessfully."

He added that Rosenberg attempted to find out why the match didn't work out, and he learned that the woman's family had turned to the Aberman family community, who had apparently spoken poorly of his character.

Eliyahu Aberman, who is thought to have been shot to death yesterday by Rosenberg, had told Gamro that the two had argued over the car that the two were found dead in yesterday.

"The two had an agreement, according to which Aberman would have access to Rosenberg's car, and in exchange Aberman would come to Rosenberg's aid in times of great need."

Two weeks ago, Rosenberg tried to reach Aberman to take back the car for an arranged date in Jerusalem, but Aberman didn't answer his call. "Every time Rosenberg called, Aberman ignored his calls. Roseberg would then call from other phones, and then Aberman would answer finally him, but come up with excuses for why he could not bring him the car," Garmo said.

Last week, Aberman sent the car back to Rosenberg, missing a few personal items. "That was a serious blow to their relationship. From Rosenberg's perspective, the Aberman family was trying to hurt him personally," Gamro added.

Over the course of the funeral, those in attendance claimed that the aforementioned letter was written yesterday before Rosenberg left the house, which raises suspicions that what transpired was premeditated. Rosenberg worked at a security firm in Rishon Lezion, which is where he acquired the gun that he is suspected of using to shoot Aberman and himself yesterday.