"Joe the Plumber," the small business aspirant and overnight media sensation who has endorsed John McCain's presidential campaign, said on Tuesday that he believed a Barack Obama presidency would spell "the death of Israel."

The Ohio plumber, whose real name is Samuel Wurzelbacher, agreed with a Jewish McCain supporter who asked him during an election rally in Ohio if he believed "a vote for Obama is a vote for the death of Israel."

"I'll go ahead and agree with you on that," Wurzelbacher told the man, retired Florida lawyer Stan Chapman who was visiting Ohio.

Wurzelbacher, who also said he believed Obama would make America a socialist nation, was joined at the rally by Rob Portman, a former Ohio congressman and budget director under President Bush, who said he disagreed with Chapman's assessment of Obama's foreign policy.

Shortly after Wurzelbacher's statement was made, the McCain campaign issued a statement saying "while he's clearly his own man, so far Joe has offered some penetrating and clear analysis that cuts to the core of many of the concerns that people have with Barack Obama's statements and policies."

Wurzelbacher was later interviewed live by phone on Fox News, where he said "listen, you don't want my opinion on foreign policy. I know just enough about foreign policy to probably be dangerous."

After the interview, anchorman Shepherd Smith expressed alarm at Wurzelbacher's statements on Obama and Israel, calling them "frightening."

Wurzelbacher became famous after he was referred to constantly in the final presidential debate. McCain has been portraying the plumber as emblematic of people with concerns about Obama's tax plans.

Wurzelbacher himself has undercut the Republican message about him by revealing he makes far less than $250,000 a year. He actually stands to fare better under Obama's tax plan, but says Obama's plan would hurt him if he were able to buy the plumbing business from his current employer.

Portman said an Obama administration would mean increased taxes on Social Security, dividends and small businesses.

"In the tough economic times that we're in, we shouldn't be raising taxes on anybody," said Portman, a McCain adviser.

Wurzelbacher's first trip to the podium was without notes. He often apologized to reporters gathered in a flag store for talking from his gut.

"I'm honestly scared for America," Wurzelbacher said.

He later said Obama would end the democracy that the U.S. military had defended during wars.

"I love America. I hope it remains a democracy, not a socialist society. ... If you look at spreading the wealth, that's honestly right out of Karl Marx's mouth," Wurzelbacher said.

"No one can debate that. That's not my opinion. That's fact."

Wurzelbacher also said he had spoken with a lawyer about news reports that his state records had been accessed, perhaps illegally. The Ohio inspector general is investigating who or why accounts assigned to Attorney General Nancy Rogers' office, the Cuyahoga County Child Support Enforcement Agency and the Toledo Police Department were used.

Wurzelbacher was scheduled to make stops in Dayton, Middletown, Milford and Cincinnati. The bus tour included guests billed as Mary the Flag Lady, Mike the Painter and Linda the Fitness Trainer.