Students at the Department of Jewelry Design are used to working with metals, plastics, glass, stones and other materials. Their experience working with paper is limited, if at all. Recently the fourth-year students received an assignment called "70% paper." As implied by the name, they were instructed to design accessories made out of 70% paper. The rest of the materials were their choice.

Sharon Keren, the head of the department, said the assignment piqued the students' interest and yielded a number of integrations between paper and various kinds of metal, stones, glass and plastic. Every student was allowed to choose how to use the paper and the other materials in the accessory he decided to design.

The department's approach, which provides room for creativity as well as the particular choices of the students and combines design of the initial idea up until the stage of the end product, has facilitated the creation of a wide range of items which were presented in the exhibition. Among them were pins, small sculptures, rings, necklaces, bracelets and earrings, most of them unconventional in their appearance.

24 fourth-year students, participated in an assignment, and it's difficult to find a great degree of similarity between the items. One of the more prominent pieces, among many, is the work of Hila Kaminer, who took a page of the English Gallery supplement, and created a large necklace. Kaminer sprinkled bits of colored paper onto the page, and folded it into precise origami shapes its ends.

As a rule, it seems as if the students of the program for jewelry design were able to pass the test, as well as keep their creative freedom despite the limitations on the materials which they were able to use.