The rain has passed and the sound of elections has not yet been heard in our land. Yet nevertheless a lot of ink has already been spilled. How will the Israeli left run in the next elections? As one large camp, together with everyone to the left of Kadima? Or each movement under its own flag? Will the new replace the old, and what form will this new entity assume?

It was not because of its configuration that the left shrunk in the past 10 years. Nor because of its messages. It was because of its electorate.

The leftist - as everyone knows - is not like other people. He is intelligent, not to say an intellectual; he is rational, sophisticated and level-headed; he doesn't tend to become overly emotional, like the hotheads from Likud; he's independent, with his own ability to think and analyze; he has an inborn objection to the herd mentality; and, as a multidisciplinary and multicultural personality, he sees the situation in all its nuanced colors, rather than in black and white. Nobody will say that he returns to the stable like a blind horse, simply because of that familiar smell.

As a person with an opinion, but free of prejudice, he knows that the enemy of the good is the very good, and that's why he will choose the lesser evil, knowing there can be no good without bad.

That's how he voted in 1999, when Ehud Barak was the lieutenant general of our dreams. That's how he voted in 2003, when Amram Mitzna was considered more Meretz than Meretz, certainly no less. But Labor quickly rejected him as a transplanted organ, because even Meretz-lite is too much for it.

And in 2006 the left's choice was self evident, just as it was a serious blow to Mapainiks (Laborites ) from the house of Herzog-Hohenzollern: Amir Peretz burst forth as a promise at dawn, caught fire like a twig in the socialist tribal campfire, and in an instant was extinguished for lack of oxygen in his party.

The importance of the leftist-voter is constantly undergoing a process of maturation, and in the 2009 elections it reached its peak of sophistication. In other words, its quintessential foolishness. This time, it took another giant step forward. In order to block Benjamin Netanyahu, it voted for Dalia Itzik, Eli Aflalo, Tzachi Hanegbi, Avi Dichter, Shaul Mofaz, Orit Zuaretz, Arie Bibi, Ruhama Avraham Balila, Majali Wahabi, Robert Tibayev, Yoel Hasson, Yulia Shamalov-Berkovich, Otniel Schneller, Marina Solodkin, Israel Hasson, Gideon Ezra, Shai Hermesh, Yohanan Plesner and Ronit Tirosh... my apologies to anyone I've omitted here.

This impressive collection was preferred to Haim Oron, Ilan Ghilon, Nitzan Horowitz and Zehava Galon, who remained outside due to a sudden shortage of ballot slips. And now the leftist is wondering and making calculations about where his camp disappeared to and why it hasn't been heard lately. And yet Netanyahu was still elected, in spite of the fact that the leftist himself sold his vote, and in spite of all his clever tactics.

The 18th Knesset will go down in perpetual disgrace due to its racist-chauvinist character, which even its speaker rejects; it will leave behind it a long trail of legislative excrement. Not only did Kadima fail to stop the abominable legislation, it supported it. Only last month most of its members supported the Nakba and Acceptance Committee laws, whether by voting in the plenum or by fleeing from it. Let me correct myself immediately: they didn't support some of the racist laws, they initiated them - the list is long and it's in front of me at this moment. These are your representatives, left-wingers, how goodly they are.

In advance of the coming elections I have an original idea, tell me what you think.

Maybe for once, and for a refreshing change, let the sophisticated, foolish voter give his vote to those who represent him faithfully all year round, and not only at Purim, when people don disguises.