• Estimated number of books: "About 1,500, in constant motion."

     

     

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  • Main genres: "Poetry, law, history and protest literature."

     

     

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  • Languages: "Hebrew, English, a small amount of Arabic."

     

     

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  • Main method of organization: "Ranging from total chaos to partial chaos, and I like this. This is a home where people and books live."

     

     

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  • Lending policy: Free and happy. Every book that goes out not only saves trees but also eases the move into the next rented apartment.

     

     

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  • Most recent acquisitions: "I bought Garen Thomas' 'Yes We Can: A Biography of Barack Obama,' and from the public library I took out Jose Saramago's 'Death With Interruptions.'"

     

     

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  • Oldest book in the library: "As a descendant of the Lewin-Epstein family [of printers], I have a number of books in my library from its Polish incarnation, in the 19th century."

     

     

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  • Your most expensive purchase: "An elegant set of the complete works of S.Y. Agnon, from Schocken Publishing."

     

     

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  • Book you haven't managed to finish: "There isn't any. I am one of those people who was raised on the categorical imperative of 'leave your plate clean.' This is true of food (to my regret) and this is true of books (mostly to my delight and sometimes also to my regret)."

     

     

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  • Favorite writers: "There will always be a place of honor for Yehuda Amichai, Wislawa Szymborska and Lea Goldberg."

     

     

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  • The book that brought you close to your field: "Uncle Tom's Cabin," by Harriet Beecher Stowe. There is simply everything in this book, starting from the paralyzing poverty that for the most part characterizes the weakened, the crushed and the oppressed, through the ease with which human beings lose their basic human integrity because of greed, to the ability to struggle and the necessity of fighting for a life of freedom. The story behind the book also touches me. In fact, as Abraham Lincoln said, this is the little book 'that made this great war,' which rid the world of the disgrace of slavery. This is the clearest example of the strength there is in the changing of consciousness as a means of achieving desired social change."

     

     

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  • Books to which you return frequently: "Professionally, I go back to Gerald Lopez's book 'Rebellious Lawyering.' And also 'A Tale of Love and Darkness,' by Amos Oz: The way the father missed out on his son and vice versa sears my innards every time anew."

     

     

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  • Your favorite line: "'As though it were possible to draw a line and say: Below it is poverty ... I was a child, in a home that was called a shack, in a neighborhood said to be a transit camp. The only line I saw was the horizon, and below it everything looked poor' (Ronny Someck, 'Rice Paradise,' 1996). And there's also a certain sentence by Nawal El Saadawi, in 'God Dies by the Nile,' when Zakeya, the heroine of the book, is asked by her friend, 'Where is Allah who will take pity on us for these agonies?' and she replies, 'calmly and with a tired smile: He is there, my daughter, dying by the Nile.'"

     

     

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  • The dedication that means the most to you: "The one my father wrote me on my 12th birthday, in a book that he bought me a few months before his sudden death: 'To Yuvali with love, from Dad.'"