The Lebanese militant group Hezbollah inaugurated a museum Friday highlighting the achievements of its "resistance" in southern Lebanon against Israel.

The event came as Israel prepares its own set of military drills.

The inauguration of the so-called Jihadist (armed struggle) museum in Mlita, east of the southern port city of Sidon, coincided with preparations for the launch of Israeli defense exercises dubbed "Turning Point 4," planned for Sunday.

Israeli military officials said the military drills are designed to prepare the grounds to confront any rocket strikes against its territories from Lebanon.

Hezbollah chief Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah, speaking via video link on a large screen to the crowd of followers gathered at the opening of the museum, said: "We launch together the jihadist tourist site, which we hope will be a correct step for preserving the history of our resistance."

"I want to say that one of our most important responsibilities is to foster the history of the resistance," Nasrallah said.

The museum showcases the various military tactics Hezbollah fighters used against Israeli soldiers during the 22-year occupation of Lebanese territories, which ended in May 2000.

It also shows caves where Hezbollah guerrillas used to hide and monitor Israeli troop movements inside the Lebanese territories during the fighting.

The area around the museum witnessed daily fighting between Hezbollah and Israeli troops during the occupation.

Meanwhile, government security sources in southern Lebanon said Hezbollah has put most of its fighters on alert to monitor the Israeli military drills scheduled for Sunday.

Israel has expressed concerns about weapons it says Hezbollah is getting from Syria and Iran, the movement's main political and military backers.

Last month, Israel accused Syria of providing Scud missiles to Hezbollah, a charge Damascus has denied.