The prosecution has prepared a draft indictment against Uriel Yitzhaki, a former Israeli consul in Holland, following the conclusion of the police investigation into his case.

Before the indictment is filed, however, Yitzhaki will presumably be granted a hearing at which he can try to persuade the attorney general to drop the charges.

The draft indictment charges Yitzhaki with taking bribes, fraud, breach of trust and sexual assault. The first three charges relate to suspicions that he accepted a bribe to supply an Israeli passport to Ya'akov Goldovsky, a former Russian businessman living in Europe, and accepted other bribes from Dutch companies in exchange for issuing them fictitious receipts that enabled them to collect money from the Foreign Ministry.

The last count accuses Yitzhaki of sexually assaulting a female subordinate 10 years ago, during an earlier stint in the embassy in Holland. According to the complainant, she went to a casino one night with several other embassy employees, including Yitzhaki, and at some point, she went out to their car to fetch something. Yitzhaki then fell upon her, tore her clothes and tried to rape her, but she managed to push him off and escape.

The woman told the embassy's security officer, who observed the scratches on both her and Yitzhaki when they returned and reported the incident to the ambassador. The ambassador apparently never did anything with the report, and Yitzhaki fired the woman a few days later. When she saw the recent media reports of Yitzhaki's arrest and investigation on other charges and told the police about her own experience.

Yitzhaki became Israel's consul in The Hague in August 2002, after previously serving in several other embassies. The police investigation against him began in late 2004, and he was arrested during a visit to Israel in April 2005.

The media reports of Yitzhaki's arrest said that he was suspected of having issued 150 passports to ineligible recipients. These allegations are not mentioned in the indictment, but they are being investigated by the Civil Service Commission, which is expected to file disciplinary charges.