The spokesman for Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi on Tuesday denied reports that Morsi has sent a letter to Israeli president Shimon Peres.

"Everything that was reported in the Israeli media regarding the letter does not correspond to reality," said Yasser Ali in a statement.

The denial by the Egyptian president's spokesman is especially odd in light of the fact that diplomats in the Egyptian embassy in Tel Aviv were the ones who passed on the missive, which was printed on the official letterhead of the ambassador along with the embassy's stamps.

Moreover, senior Egyptian officials in Cairo notified the Israeli embassy in Cairo about the missive.

The letter, which was written in English and dated July 15, came as a response to a message sent by Peres a month ago, in which the president congratulated Morsi for his victory in the elections, and offered his blessing ahead of the month of Ramadan.

In response, Morsi thanked Peres on his "congratulations on the advent of the Holy Month of Ramadan."

"I am looking forward to exerting our best efforts to get the Middle East peace process back to its right track in order to achieve security and stability for all peoples of the region, including [the] Israeli people," Morsi said in the missive.

Last month, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu sent a missive to Morsi congratulating him on winning the Egyptian election. Netanyahu offered to cooperate with the new government in Cairo and expressed his hope that both parties would observe the Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty.

Netanyahu's letter was the first official message from Israel to a representative of the Muslim Brotherhood, which won both the parliamentary elections and the presidential elections in Egypt.

Since his victory, Morsi and his aides stressed to U.S. and European officials that they intend to respect all international treaties which Egypt has signed, including the peace treaty with Israel.