Did the president exceed the limits of his position? A president in Israel is an honorary post, a great grandfather who comes to say a nice hello to the new first graders. Officially, he's Citizen No. 1. In reality, there are dignitaries more important than he.

Shimon Peres, with all due respect, sometimes forgets that he is only a president, elected by the Knesset, and not by all the people of Israel. He has never received rabbinical certification, nor will he. With all the titles he's earned, he will always lack one: a rabbi in Israel, the great Rabbi Shimon, may he live a long life.

Had Peres risen to the level of Maran (literally, "Our Master," a title reserved for exceptionally respected rabbis ), he would be allowed to unleash his tongue and to attack as he wishes. The prime minister and his yes-men would not dare to attack him, to remind him of his early sins; they would not even have chided him gently. Because here, in the Holy Land, we don't criticize anyone holy. We save our attacks for the secular.

After all, terrible things are heard here every day, but the official silence covers them as water covers the sea, because they come from the mouths of our rabbis. Rabbis incite, curse, sow hatred, encourage strife and let blood flow. They insult and humiliate women and Arabs, refugees and migrant workers, homosexuals and Reform Jews, leftists and ordinary secular people - all of them from the seed of Amalek. And the heads of government and of its authorities wrap themselves in silence; legislators and law enforcers make sure to differentiate between slander of donkeys and slander of Admorim (scholarly Hasidic leaders ), finding every abomination kosher as long as it is the word of Torah.

Thus we continue to finance the religious zealots who draw their salary from the public coffers; that is Torah and that is its reward. For a moment the president suffered from megalomania. He compared himself to a great Torah scholar, and was immediately put in his place, and rightly so.

Only in recent days has Shas spiritual leader Rabbi Ovadia Yosef returned to the sewers, swept them clean, and once again besmirched Israel's judges: "Wicked men all and unfit to be witnesses, may God destroy them." Not only do they "judge in the manner of the nations of the world and hate the Torah," they "also accept the testimony of a woman."

Added to the black list are Israeli parents, "wicked and unacceptable people" who "send their children to a secular school rather than a religious school." And no minister was willing to put the rabbi in his place, the same rabbi who who supports Shas offenders who've been convicted of criminal behavior. Even the education minister did not stand up for tens of thousands of teachers and millions of students. He didn't open his mouth, because he didn't see fit to do so. I'm the prosecutor in his place.

But the prime minister did see fit to send the head of the National Security Council to the rabbi, in order to conscript him for a holy war. An associate once asked me: "Why do you even pay attention to Ovadia, he's already totally senile." But meanwhile, he is the one who will decide on the war. Netanyahu refuses to see the president now, but he sees the rabbi's backside, and lick it.

It's a tragedy that two countries that are so similar are in conflict, perhaps precisely because of that similarity. Bibi, like Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, is dependent on his Baba - his "spiritual leader." Ali and Ovadia, Khamenei and Yosef, are the ones who will decide in which direction we are headed. And when one religion meets its rival, that's a problem. When the "supreme leader" collides with his counterpart - as supreme as he is - only God will save us from the war of the ayatollahs versus the ayatollahs.

And on the eve of Rosh Hashanah, two weeks from now, the president and prime minister will be seeking him out. The Jewish government wants the rabbi and comes to him in order to thank, praise, laud, glorify, uplift, extol, bless and adore the one who is taking us from light to great darkness. And he will slap them lightly on the cheek as a sign of affection for the young children who study with their teachers.