A wax figure of Anne Frank was unveiled Friday at Madame Tussauds Wax Museum in Berlin, and is now part of the permanent exhibition of the wax museum in the German capital.

The Jewish girl is displayed in a setting that resembles her room in the attack of the Amsterdam house in which she, together with her family, hid from the Nazis until they were court and sent to their deaths in 1944. Alongside the wax model are some of Frank's favorite things, including magazines about the latest trends in cinema and theater and a copy of "Uncle Tom's Cabin," a book she loves.

The new Anne Frank figure is situated next to that of Sophie Scholl, an activist executed by the Nazi regime for her involvement in the White Rose, a non-violent German resistance group. In the next room stands a headless figure of Adolf Hitler, which was decapitated by a visitor shortly after the museum's opening in 2008 and then restored.

The Anne Frank model was created by a London-based team who worked closely with a group of expert researchers, and referred to written and photographed documents. "Anne Frank was such a hopeful person," said museum spokeswoman Nina Zerbe over the weekend. "It's that sense of optimism that we want to convey in this figure."

Additional figures on display at the wax museum include Albert Einstein, Sigmund Freud, Angela Merkel, Barack Obama, Bertolt Brecht, Karl Marx, and Otto von Bismarck.

Last week, it was announced that the belongings of the Frank family, including thousands of letters and toys, would be returned to their hometown of Frankfurt, to be displayed at the city's Jewish Museum. Anne Frank's famous diary, which she wrote between 1942 and 1944, is not among the items sent to Frankfurt on permanent loan; it will remain in the Anne Frank Museum in Amsterdam.