A clear majority of Palestinians doubt that efforts led by the United States to bring Israelis and Palestinians back to the negotiating table would result in a fair peace agreement, a recent Gallup poll shows.

Almost three in four (74%) of Palestinian adults interviewed by Gallup disagreed that the U.S. is currently more serious than it was in the past about brokering a peace deal  that would offer a solution acceptable by both Israelis and Palestinians. In fact, only 12% said they trust the Barack Obama administration's ability to reach a viable agreement, while 14% refused or couldn't answer the question.

Moreover, two in three (66%) Palestinians said they do not trust the U.S. as a peace broker. Only 1% said they have a great deal of trust in U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry's and Obama's ability to deliver an equally fair agreement, while 7% said they have a fair amount of trust and 23% answered they do not have much trust.

The poll was conducted between May 21 and June 4, 2013, ahead of Kerry's announcement in July that both Israel and the Palestinian leadership agreed to resume peace talks.

A poll conducted four days after Kerry's announcement showed that 55% of Israelis were inclined to support any peace deal with the Palestinians brought by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. However, 70% of respondents said they do not believe a peace agreement will be achieved.

Negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians are expected to resume on Tuesday in Washington after almost three years of stalemate and are expected to be based on 1967 borders with land swaps.

Ahead of the talks, and as part of the agreement with Kerry, the Israeli government is expected to approve on Sunday the release of 104 veteran prisoners being held in jail since before the 1993 Oslo Accords between Israel and the Palestinians. The Palestinians had conditioned their return to the table with the release of all long-time prisoners.