WATCH: The Five Best Moments at the Emmy Awards

Predictable choices, a lifeless emcee and a lack of daring marked the annual ceremony, but there were a few redeeming moments.

Aaron Paul, from left, Anna Gunn and Bryan Cranston attend the Governors Ball at the 66th Primetime
Aaron Paul, from left, Anna Gunn and Bryan Cranston attend the Governors Ball at the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards at the Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on Monday, Aug. 25, 2014, in Los Angeles. AP

The 66th annual Emmy Awards ceremony on Monday almost let us forget the fact that we’re in the golden age of television. Instead of celebrating the large number of sophisticated, intelligent and surprising series that are flooding the small screen, we got a boring, conservative and exhausting event, lifeless hosting by actor-comedian Seth Meyers – and worst of all, more awards for “Modern Family,” which has long since stopped being funny or modern.

The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences proved that it doesn’t have a ounce of daring already during the nominee stage this year, when it ignored “The Americans, “Orphan Black,” “Hannibal,” and stars such as Amy Rosom (“Shameless”), Chris Messina (“The Mindy Project”), Dean Norris (“Breaking Bad”) Bellamy Young (“Scandal”), Wendy McLendon-Covey (“The Goldbergs”) and Timothy Simons (“Veep”).

There were also predictable choices of past winners at the Los Angeles ceremony, and with all due respect to the brilliant “Breaking Bad” and to the outstanding Julianna Margulies in “The Good Wife,” the recipients have enough Emmy awards in their resumes already, and the time really has come to inject some new blood into the ceremony.

Still, the event did have a handful of charming, moving and entertaining moments. For those of you who dreamed that the stars of “True Detective” or “Game of Thrones” would win awards, and spared themselves three hours of one disappointment after another, here are the “highlights” of the Emmys:

Woody Harrelson imitates Matthew McConaughey and teases him about the plagiarism in “True Detective”

Bryan Cranston and Julia Louis-Dreyfus kiss in a tribute to their relationship in “Seinfeld”

Gwen Stefani mispronounces the winning “The Colbert Report” and Jimmy Fallon exploits the mistake to speak in his name while Colbert whispers in his ear

Jimmy Kimmel also makes fun of McConaughey in a monologue that was funnier than all of Meyers’ jokes

Billy Crystal gives a tribute to the late Robin Williams

The full list of winners:

Drama series: “Breaking Bad”

Actor in a drama series: Bryan Cranston, “Breaking Bad”

Actress in a drama series: Julianna Margulies, “The Good Wife”

Supporting actor in a drama series: Aaron Paul, “Breaking Bad”

Supporting actress in a drama series: Anna Gunn, “Breaking Bad”

Director, drama series: Cary Joji Fukunaga, “True Detective”

Writing, drama series: Moira Walley-Beckett, “Breaking Bad”

Comedy: “Modern Family”

Actor in a comedy series: Jim Parsons, “The Big Bang”

Actress in a comedy series: Julia Louis-Dreyfus, “Veep”

Supporting actor in a comedy series: Ty Burrell, “Modern Family”

Supporting actress in a comedy series: Allison Janney, “Mom”

Director, comedy series: Gail Mancuso, “Modern Family”

Writing, comedy series: Louis C.K., “Louie”

Mini-series: “Fargo”

Actor in a mini-series: Benedict Cumberbatch, “Sherlock: His Last Vow”

Actress in a mini-series: Jessica Lange, “American Horror Story: Coven”

Supporting actor in a mini-series: Martin Freeman, “Sherlock: His Last Vow”

Supporting actress in a mini-series: Kathy Bates, “American Horror Story: Coven”

Director, mini-series or television film: Colin Bucksey, “Fargo”

Writing, mini-series: Steven Moffat, “Sherlock: His Last Vow”

Made for television film: “The Ordinary Heart”

Variety show: “The Colbert Report”

Director, variety show: Glenn Weiss, “67th Tony Awards”

Writing, variety show: Sarah Silverman, “We Are Miracles”

Reality show: “The Amazing Race”