Ten Years After 9/11, anti-Semitic Conspiracies 'Still Going Strong'

'For ten years, the historical record has been warped and manipulated by anti-Semites intent on creating their false version of history', says Anti-Defamation League national director.

As the 10-year anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attack on the twin towers approaches, anti-Semitic conspiracy theories are "alive and well", according to a report by the Anti-Defamation League (ADL).

The conspiracy theories, which are fueled by a well-established industry of propaganda, claim Israel or Jews are responsible for the attacks instead of al-Qaida.

September 11 attack.
AP

ADL National Director Abraham H. Foxman said he finds it sad that the tragedy of September 11, which united American people through their suffering, is being manipulated by anti-Semites to sell their own "sinister" agenda.

"It is shocking that nearly a decade after 9/11 we are still confronted with those who continue to deny the historical record of 9/11 or who hold fast to anti-Semitic myths about that horrific day,” said Foxman.

“For ten years, the historical record has been warped and manipulated by anti-Semites intent on creating their false version of history. One of the saddest outcomes of 9/11 is that despite the fact that this national tragedy that brought Americans together, there remains this small group of vocal bigots who, nearly a decade later, are still seeking to promote and sell their own sinister agenda of blaming Jews and Israel.”

According to the ADL, the most prominent promoters of anti-Semitic conspiracy theories today are members of anti-Israel groups who suggest the September 11 attacks were a "false flag" operation that served as part of an ongoing attempt by Israel to wage a war against its Muslim "enemies".

The accusation that Jews and Israel were responsible for planning and executing the attacks has remained a constant thread over the past decade, despite the changes in details of particular conspiracy theories.

The Internet has provided a luscious playing ground for anti-Israel conspiracy theorists, who have found a "built-in" audience online, among whom they can spread their stories. According to the ADL, conspiracy theories have been shared on conspiracy-oriented web sites, social networking sites and video sites. In addition, a flood of books and DVDs have also kept those conspiracies alive, one decade after they began.