No More Mr. Nice (Jewish) Guy? Wholesome Calendar Gets Naughty New Rival

'Naughty Jewish Boys' has been launched to challenge the 'Nice Jewish Guys' calendar, which has been making Jewish mothers proud since 2011.

The American Jewish community is being rocked by a conflict over its nice – or naughty – young men.

"Nice Jewish Guys," the calendar which has made countless Jewish mothers beam with pride since its launch in 2011, has sold more than 10,000 copies of its latest edition.

But the calendar, which is filled with pictures of smiling, young men doing wholesome things, has a rival in new kid on the block "Naughty Jewish Boys."

The new calendar was launched by Astoria playwright Duncan Pflaster as an alternative to the "emasculating 'Nice Jewish Boys' [sic] calendar currently out," according to the New York Post.

Advertising on Craigslist in February for pin-up hopefuls, Pflaster claimed his calendar would "show the sexy side of Judaism." The ad also said: “Chubby/hairy OK. Yarmulkes and peyos a plus.”

The two calendars are at opposite ends of the Jewish pin-up spectrum. "Nice Jews Guys" shows wholesome Jewish guys holding puppies and challah, playing the piano, and all the sorts of things that a good mensch would do. Its slogan is "You can take them home to Mom!"

"Naughty Jewish Boys," meanwhile, set for release in late summer or fall, will feature half-naked men wearing kippot and laying teffilin. A second fully-naked version will be available, too.

"Nice Jewish Guys," started by TV producer Adam Cohen, isn't taking this challenge lying down, however. Pflaster got a letter from the "Nice Jewish Guys" lawyer saying that the new calendar's name was too close to their own, and asking Pflaster not to use it.

“I don’t think there’s any way our calendars can be confused,” the Post cited Pflaster as saying. “I’ve tried to make that clear on the Web site and on all of the materials.” Pflaster responded that the trademark infringement case was "weak," the Post reported, and said he would not stop using the name.

Cohen refused to discuss the issue with the New York Post, on the advice of his lawyer.