How Do You Wish Someone Happy Passover? Google Releases Trending Holiday Searches

Confusion about what to say spurred many searches, but Google may have just added to the confusion with its reference to the traditional holiday "cedar."

Gigantic Easter eggs and people dressed in rabbit costumes mark Easter celebrations in Bucharest, Romania.
An Easter celebration in Bucharest, Romania earlier this week. Vadim Ghirda) / AP

How do you wish someone Happy Passover? And should you even do so? Those are among the top trending Passover-related searches conducted by Googlers in the wake of the Jewish holiday that just ended.  

Easter – which coincided with Passover this year – prompted its share of searches too, with "what is Palm Sunday" the top trending one.

While the appropriate greeting for the Jewish winter holiday – Happy Hannukah – is familiar to most, there is considerable hesitation about what to say to those celebrating Passover, according to Google. Four out of five trending questions on the festival concern what, if anything, to say, including #5 on the list "How to say happy Passover in Yiddish?" along with other variations like: Do you say Happy Passover? (#1) How to say happy Passover? (#3) and what do you say on Passover (#4).

"Is Easter a national holiday?" and "How to dye Easter eggs" were among the top five searches on the Christian holiday.

However, those seeking accurate information on Passover would be advised not to put all their eggs in the Google basket. While the search engine cites egg hunts and Easter bunnies as well-known traditions associated with Easter, it claims that "for Passover, the traditional cedar is customary." The reference to a tree will come as a surprise to most Jews, who mark the holiday with a similar-sounding seder, or ceremonial meal during which the Haggadah is read.

In one peculiar finding involving a showdown between searches for Easter bunny versus Easter eggs, all but one U.S. state sought bunnies, with Utah the holdout for eggs.

In one peculiar finding involving a showdown between searches for Easter bunny versus Easter eggs, all but one U.S. state sought bunnies, with Utah the holdout for eggs.
Google Trends

Passover recipes were popular among Googlers, with haroset, kugel, brisket, matzo ball soup and flourless chocolate cake constituting the top five, in that order.