LeBron James
Miami Heat's LeBron James passes the ball against the Memphis Grizzlies in the second quarter of an NBA basketball game in Miami, Saturday, March 12, 2011. Photo by AP
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It’s early January, and Jay Sanderson is talking in his corner office on the 11th floor of The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles’ headquarters about his first year as president of Federation, explaining the versatility and passion he expects of his staff.

“I want everyone to be a LeBron James," he says, and seems genuinely puzzled when his reference is questioned.

“LeBron James is a great basketball player, because he can score and he can rebound, but he’s also a great passer and he can play great defense,” Sanderson adds.

James is also nationally reviled as opportunistic and disloyal. Last year, he famously quit and dissed his hometown Cleveland Cavaliers to join the Miami Heat, bragging about what he could do there.

So, is Jay Sanderson misunderstood or ruthless? And in the end, if he is taking Federation in the direction it needs to go, does his personal style matter?

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