Hamantaschen, Purim
Hamantaschen. Photo by Archive
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If you're thinking about which kinds of hamantaschen you are going to be baking for this year's Purim celebrations, now is the time to concider prune filling.

Truthfully, I never particularly liked prune-filled hamantaschen — or most traditional hamantaschen flavors, for that matter. They all just seemed so quaint and uninspired. I suppose the crumbly, yellow triangles filled with hyper-sweet canned pastes that passed for hamantaschen during my childhood in the 1980s also played a part in shaping my distaste. For years I avoided eating hamantaschen entirely. But as an adult I learned to make my own, starting with homemade dough and then filling the pockets with more contemporary flavors, like pear and ginger compote, Nutella swirled with almond butter, or chunks of white chocolate and raspberry jam. At a hamantaschen-making party a couple of years ago, my guests and I ditched the sweet stuff completely, adding dried herbs to the dough, and stuffing the center with a savory mix of sautéed onions, mushrooms and cheddar cheese.

Still, as delicious as these unorthodox fillings are, there is always a case to be made for tradition — perhaps not an ersatz, highly processed replica of tradition, but tradition the way it was originally intended. So, while prune hamantaschen are not a part of my own Purim nostalgia, they are worth revisiting. That’s where Simon Fischer comes in.

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