Veils, Turbans and Kippot Given the Go Ahead by FIFA

Ending a two-year trial period, the International Football Association Board decides soccer players can wear head covers for religious purposes during matches.

The International Football Association Board approved the wearing of head covers for religious purposes during soccer matches on Saturday, ending a two-year trial period.

"It was decided that female players can cover their heads to play," FIFA secretary general Jerome Valcke said after the meeting in Zurich. He said the same would be applied to men, except that their head cover's color must be "the same as the team jersey."

Last month, Israel’s soccer association suspended its ban on wearing kippot for its minor leagues.

Israeli media reported on the new regulation after a player from Jaffa, Yair Cohen-Tzedek, protested against the prohibition. According to Army Radio, he has asked teammates from Maccabi Kabilio Jaffa and fans to all wear kippot at future matches as a sign of solidarity with his campaign to have the new regulation scrapped.

In 2010, Hapoel Tel Aviv's Itay Schechter was yellow-carded in a Champions League qualifying match against FC Salzburg for celebrating a goal by donning a kippah.