Netanyahu's Son: Neo-Nazi Scum Belong to the Past, Far-left Thugs Getting Stronger

Yair Netanyahu says 'Antifa and BLM who hate my country (and America too in my view) just as much are becoming super dominant in American universities and public life'

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his son Yair, 2015.
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his son Yair, 2015. AFP

Yair Netanyahu, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's 26-year-old son, posted on Facebook that he is more concerned with far-left "thugs" rather than neo-Nazi "scum," arguing that "the latter belong to the past."

"I'm a Jew, I'm an Israeli, the neo nazis scums in Virginia hate me and my country. But they belong to the past. Their breed is dying out," Netanyahu wrote on his personal, private Facebook page.

"However, the thugs of Antifa and BLM who hate my country (and America too in my view) just as much are getting stronger and stronger and becoming super dominant in American universities and public life."

The left-wing Molad think tank filed a libel suit against the younger Netanyahu earlier this month for his Facebook post responding to an article entitled "Five things you didn't know about the heir to the throne, Yair Netanyahu." The 26-year-old called the organization "the radical anti-Zionist organization Molad, which is funded [in turn] by the Israel Destruction Fund and the European Union." Molad describes itself as a site providing critical material to the Israeli public on socioeconomic issues and on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict."

In another post Netanyahu wrote, "The Fund for the Destruction of Israel, funded by Soros and the European Union, is threatening me in the style of the Sicilian mafia. Actually, the term Bolsheviks suits them better."

Meanwhile, Yair Hazan, foreign affairs director of the Likud party, disparaged the Israeli left in a tweet he attributed to Winston Churchill. "With some of the Israeli social democrats - the future is here," tweeted Hazan, adding a photo of Churchill and the quote: "The fascists of the future will call themselves anti-fascists."

The quote was not in fact uttered by the British leader, though it is occasionally ascribed to him.  It was an American politician, Huey Long, who is credited with the quote  according to Quote Investigator. Long, a Democratic politician, was assassinated in 1935, a month after announcing he planned to run for U.S. president.