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  • Estimated number of books: About 1,500 (at home and at the office).

  • Main genres: Art, psychology, philosophy, history and belles lettres.

  • Languages: English, German, Russian, French and of course my mother tongue, Romanian.

  • Method of organization: In the study, books in the fields of psychotherapy, creativity and education; in the living room, art books and literature. And in the bedroom, the collection I love the most, most of which is related to the field of ancient history, which is dear to me: Alexander the Great, Primo Levi, Umberto Eco.

  • Lending policy: Liberal, though a lot of people have borrowed and not returned.

  • Most recent acquisitions: "Hamehonanim" ("The Gifted"), by Asaf Tzipor. As you know, gifted children are my life's work.

  • Oldest book in the library: Leonardo da Vinci's "Codex," leather-bound, from the end of the 19th century, which I found once thrown out in the street in Ramat Aviv in a pile that had been removed from an apartment. I went into the apartment and told them there were valuable and special books being thrown out there. There were sons who were clearing out the apartment of their parents, who had died. They were very contemptuous of their parents' collection and said their books were obsolete and irrelevant, and that I could take whatever I wanted - so I took. There was even an original drawing by [Israeli painter] Anna Ticho.

  • The book you can't seem to get through: Out of respect for the author, I finish every book I take up. Even if it's bad.

  • The nicest cover: When I read a good book, I lose sight of the externals, and when I read a bad book, that doesn't interest me.

  • Your favorite writers: Philip Roth, Upton Sinclair, Goethe, Schiller and Albert Camus - the day he died in a car accident (I think he committed suicide) was a particularly sad day for me.

  • The book that helped prompt you to go into your field: "The Rebel: An Essay on Man in Revolt," by Camus.

  • Beloved book from your childhood: Selma Lagerlof's "The Wonderful Adventures of Nils."

  • Favorite book: "If This is a Man," by Primo Levi.

  • The books to which you return most frequently: I don't really like rereading books, but if I do, then the books of Umberto Eco and Primo Levi.

  • A book you want but can't get: Itzik Manger's "The Book of Paradise," in German.

  • Your favorite line: The last line of [Heinrich] von Kleist's essay "On the Marionette Theater." He ends it with the sentence, "But we ate from the tree of knowledge," as if to say that all is well, but we lost our innocence.

  • The dedication you hold most dear: Actually, a dedication that I wrote to someone else. When I published my first book, which is based on my doctorate, about the connection between creativity and giftedness, I brought the book to a self-important professor of education. He took the book and immediately demanded that I write him a dedication, which he dictated: "With deep feelings, with appreciation, with admiration and with great esteem." I looked at his face for any sign of jest, but he was as serious as anything. I haven't forgotten this story, and it teaches me how important it is to retain some modesty.