Woody Allen
Woody Allen, Dec. 29, 2011 Photo by AP
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Film director Woody Allen denied the recent accusations of his adopted daughter that he molested her when she was 7, insisting in an open letter on Friday that the allegation was fabricated by her mother, actress Mia Farrow, with whom he was then fighting a custody battle.

The response by Allen, 78, to the accusations of sexual assault by Dylan Farrow, now 28, was published on the New York Times' website five days after she gave the newspaper her own account that repeated and elaborated on those allegations.

"I did not molest Dylan," Allen wrote. "I loved her and hope one day she will grasp how she has been cheated out of having a loving father and exploited by a mother more interested in her own festering anger than her daughter's well-being."

In an open-letter to The New York Times posted online a week ago, Dylan Farrow made her first public comments about the 1992 incident. In a letter to op-ed columnist Nicholas Kristof, she said she was moved to speak out because of Hollywood's continued embrace of Allen.

"That he got away with what he did to me haunted me as I grew up," wrote Farrow. "I was stricken with guilt that I had allowed him to be near other little girls."

The New York Times reported that Allen declined comment. Also, representatives for Allen and for former partner Mia Farrow also did not immediately return requests for comment Saturday from The Associated Press. Allen, who attended Saturday night's New York Knicks game, has long maintained his innocence.

In the letter, Dylan Farrow claims that in 1992 at the family's Connecticut home, Allen led her to a "dim, closet-like attic" and "then he sexually assaulted me." Farrow didn't specify Allen's actions, but described other abusive behavior.

Farrow said Allen would have her get in bed with him, and at other times "place his head in my naked lap and breathe in and breathe out."

"For as long as I could remember, my father had been doing things to me that I didn't like," said Farrow. "These things happened so often, so routinely, so skillfully hidden from a mother that would have protected me had she known, that I thought it was normal."

Allen was investigated on child molestation claims for the alleged 1992 incident in Connecticut, but prosecutors elected not to charge him.