Still from the documentary 'Israel: A Home Movie,' a film by Arik bernstein & Eliav Lilti.
Still from the documentary 'Israel: A Home Movie,' a film by Arik Bernstein and Eliav Lilti.
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Ilya Melnikov
A scene from 'The Garden of Eden.' Photo by Ilya Melnikov

Films about a popular Israeli national park and a group of cashiers at a Tel Aviv supermarket are among the finalists in this year’s Israeli Documentary Film Competition for full-length films. Five films were named on Tu, with the winner to be announced in the autumn.

The finalists are “The Garden of Eden,” directed by Ran Tal; “The Lesson,” by Anat Yuta Zuria; “Israel: A Home Movie,” by Eliav Lilti; “Caught in the Net” by Shosh Shlam and Hila Medalia; and “Super Women,” by Yael Kipper Zaretsky and Ronen Zaretsky.

The winner will be announced by the Israeli Documentary Filmmakers Forum - which sponsors the competition - in early November (an exact date hasn’t yet been set). Prizes worth a total of NIS 1 million will be awarded in seven categories.

“The Garden of Eden” is about Gan Hashlosha, one of Israel’s most popular parks, and the wide range of Israelis who visit and work there.

“The Lesson” features Layla, an Egyptian woman living in Israel after being abandoned by her Israeli husband, and the driving lessons she takes in an effort to earn her driver’s license.

“Israel: A Home Movie” tells the story of Israel from the 1930s through the 1970s via a collage of home movies shot during those years. “Super Women” follows a group of cashiers who work in a Ramat Aviv supermarket and their efforts to survive. And “Caught in the Net” is about a center set up in China, to help youth cure themselves of their Internet addiction.

Prizes will also be awarded in six other categories, including best short documentary (up to 69 minutes in length); best television documentary; best debut film; best student film; and best journalistic reporting.

The finalists in the television category are “Ichilov,” by Ruthie Shatz and Adi Barash; “Life as a Rumor,” by Adi Arbel and Moish Goldberg; “Culture Heroes,” by Anat Zeltser, Ori Sivan, Sivan Arbel and Gur Bentwich; and two films by Uri Rosenwaks: “Lod: Between Hope and Despair” and “Leibowitz: Faith, Country and Man.”