Middle Eastern chocolate bark
Middle Eastern chocolate bark
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In honor of Valentine’s Day, the countless food magazines, blogs and papers are filled with suggestions of what to eat with your special someone: seductive menus and sensuous, sexy, rich chocolate desserts.

As for me - a sensible Jewish girl - I always thought it was more about what not to eat on Valentine’s Day, rather than what to eat. If you want to have a real romantic evening, that is.

So here’s my list:

Do not eat anything with herbs, especially tabbuleh and the like - no matter how careful you are, a tiny green leaf will always get stuck between your teeth.

No to poppy seeds, for the same reason. Or sesame seeds.

No to heavy meaty dishes. You don’t want to fall asleep right after dinner.

No to any gooey cheesy dishes, that will embarrass you when making you pull a never-ending string of cheese that will then stick (unnoticeable to you) on your chin. True story.

No to raw onions, or garlic.

No to any legume, including (but not limited to) cannellini beans, fava beans, chickpeas.

Come to think of it, that really does leave us just with chocolate.

As I was looking around my kitchen for an inspiration for a chocolaty dish, I noticed the sad bowl of dried fruit and nuts still standing there since Tu Bishvat (the salad and cake were long gone).

Being that sensible Jewish girl that I am, I knew I had to use them - after all, we never throw away food - and so I decided to use the dried fruit and nuts to make a Middle Eastern chocolate bark that I could then divide between all my Valentines.

I promise we will discuss real seductive food options on the real Jewish love day - Tu B’Av (which, for those of you who don’t follow the Hebrew calendar closely, comes out some time in the summer.)

For more recipes, check out Food and Wine on Haaretz.com